Thursday, October 18, 2018

DO YOU WANT TO RE-ELECT A CONGRESSMAN WHO SCORES ZERO ON CIVIL RIGHTS ISSUES?

U.S. House of Representatives
A Hartzler Amendment to the FY 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (H. Amdt. 183)
Rep. Vicky Hartzler (R-MO) offered an amendment to the FY 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 2810) to ban access to transitionrelated
healthcare for military service members and their families. The House defeated the amendment on July 13, 2017, by a vote of 209-214
(Roll Call Vote No. 369, 1st Session, 115th Congress). Democrats – 0 yes, 190 no, 4 not voting; Republicans – 209 yes, 24 no, 6 not voting.
HRC opposed the amendment.
B Resolution to Nullify Rule Ensuring Provider Access to Title X Family Planning Program (H. J. Res. 43)
Rep. Diane Black (R-TN) introduced a joint resolution to nullify a Department of Health and Human Services rule that sought to ensure no
qualified provider is excluded from eligibility for federal funding under the Title X family planning program for reasons unrelated to their ability
to provide family planning services. The rule would have prevented Title X family planning grant recipients from banning abortion providers, like
Planned Parenthood, from receiving Title X funds. The House passed the resolution on February 16, 2017, by a vote of 230-188 (Roll Call Vote
No. 99, 1st Session, 115th Congress). Democrats – 2 yes, 186 no, 5 not voting; Republicans – 228 yes, 2 no, 7 not voting. HRC opposed the
resolution.
C Affordable Care Act Repeal (H.R. 1628)
Rep. Diane Black (R-TN) introduced the American Health Care Act to repeal core provisions of the Affordable Care Act, which would make
it more difficult for vulnerable populations, including LGBTQ people and people living with HIV, to obtain healthcare. The House passed the
bill on May 4, 2017, by a vote of 217-213 (Roll Call Vote No. 256, 1st Session, 115th Congress). Democrats – 0 yes, 193 no, 0 not voting;
Republicans – 217 yes, 20 no, 1 not voting. HRC opposed the bill.
D Immigration Discharge Petition (Discharge Petition No. 0010)
Rep. Carlos Curbelo (R-FL) introduced a discharge petition to require a vote on H. Res. 774 to set forth the rules for a debate and vote on four
immigration bills, including the opportunity to vote on the Dream Act. The discharge petition did not receive the 218 signatures needed to force
a vote on H. Res. 774 and the four immigration bills. The petition had 216 signatures: Democrats 193; Republicans 23. HRC supported the
discharge petition.
14 HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN CONGRESSIONAL SCORECARD | 115th CONGRESS
E Equality Act (H.R. 2282) (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor legislation introduced on May 2, 2017, that would provide consistent and explicit non-discrimination
protections for LGBTQ people across key areas of life, including employment, housing, credit, education, public spaces and services, federally
funded programs, and jury service. The measure had 199 co-sponsors: Democrats 196; Republicans 2; Independents 1.
F Do No Harm Act (H.R. 3222) (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor legislation introduced on July 13, 2017, that would amend the Religious Freedom Restoration Act
(RFRA) to exempt areas of law where RFRA has been used to bypass federal protections, including civil rights laws, thus restoring the original
intent of the legislation and clarifying that RFRA is intended to protect religious freedom without allowing the infliction of harm on other people.
The measure had 171 co-sponsors: Democrats 171; Republicans 0; Independents 0.
G Therapeutic Fraud Prevention Act (H.R. 2119) (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor legislation introduced on April 25, 2017, that would officially classify the provision and advertising
of conversion therapy in exchange for monetary compensation as fraudulent practices and expressly direct the Federal Trade Commission
to protect consumers from these harmful and discredited practices. The measure had 171 co-sponsors: Democrats 171; Republicans 0;
Independents 0.
H Safe Schools Improvement Act (H.R. 1957) (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor legislation introduced on April 5, 2017, that would amend the Elementary and Secondary Education
Act (ESEA) to require school districts in states that receive ESEA funds to adopt codes of conduct specifically prohibiting bullying and
harassment, including on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, and religion. The measure had
188 co-sponsors: Democrats 172; Republicans 16; Independents 0.
I International Human Rights Defense Act (H.R. 6033) (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor legislation introduced on June 7, 2018, that would build a framework into U.S. diplomacy to protect
LGBTQ rights worldwide, by making preventing and responding to discrimination and violence against the LGBTQ community a foreign policy
priority and creating a Special Envoy within the State Department who would serve as principal advisor to the Secretary of State on LGBTQ
issues. The measure had 170 co-sponsors: Democrats 169; Republicans 1; Independents 0.
J Voting Rights Advancement Act (H.R. 2978) (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor legislation introduced on June 21, 2017, that would strengthen voting rights by expanding and
strengthening the government's ability to respond to voting discrimination. The measure had 193 co-sponsors: Democrats 193; Republicans 0;
Independents 0.
HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN CONGRESSIONAL SCORECARD | 115th CONGRESS 15
K Non-Discrimination Bills (Co-Sponsorship)
Representatives were asked to co-sponsor bills that would provide consistent and explicit non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people in
one of the key areas also covered by the Equality Act. Representatives were given full credit for co-sponsoring at least one of the following:
I The Customer Non-Discrimination Act (H.R. 3520), which was introduced on July 27, 2017, would provide consistent and explicit nondiscrimination
protections for LGBTQ people and women in accessing public spaces and services by amending Title II of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964 to include actual or perceived sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity as protected characteristics. Additionally, it would update the
public spaces and services covered in current law to include retail stores, services such as banks and legal services, healthcare providers, and
transportation services for all protected characteristics. The measure had 80 co-sponsors: Democrats 80; Republicans 0; Independents 0.
II The Fair and Equal Housing Act (H.R. 1447), which was introduced on March 9, 2017, would provide consistent and explicit non-discrimination
protections for LGBTQ people in housing by amending the Fair Housing Act to include actual or perceived sexual orientation and gender identity
as protected characteristics. The measure had 104 co-sponsors: Democrats 86; Republicans 18; Independents 0.
III The Freedom from Discrimination in Credit Act (H.R. 2498), which was introduced on May 17, 2017, would provide consistent and explicit
non-discrimination protections for LGBTQ people in credit by amending the Equal Credit Opportunity Act to include actual or perceived sexual
orientation and gender identity as protected characteristics. The measure had 84 co-sponsors: Democrats 82; Republicans 2; Independents 0.
IV The Juror Non-Discrimination Act (H.R. 1515), which was introduced on March 13, 2017, would provide consistent and explicit non-discrimination
protections for LGBTQ people in jury selection in federal courts by amending the Jury Selection and Services Act to include sexual orientation and
gender identity as protected characteristics. The measure had 82 co-sponsors: Democrats 74; Republicans 8; Independents 0.
V The Student Non-Discrimination Act (H.R. 5374), which was introduced on March 21, 2018, would provide consistent and explicit nondiscrimination
protections for LGBTQ students by prohibiting any public school from discriminating against a student on the basis of actual or
perceived sexual orientation or gender identity. The measure had 172 co-sponsors: Democrats 169; Republicans 3; Independents 0.
16 HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN CONGRESSIONAL SCORECARD | 115th CONGRESS
KEY
I IHRDA KH SSIA G TFPA C ACA REPEAL F DNHA E EQUALITY ACT
HARTZLER
AMENDMENT
AD IMMIGRATION
DISCHARGE PETITION
B
D
F
H
J REPRESENTATIVE (Party)
115th
SCORE
114th
SCORE
113th
SCORE
B TITLE X RESOLUTION
NON-DISCRIMINATION
LEGISLATION
I
II FEHA
III FDCA
IV JNDA
SNDA
I II III IV
v Supported HRC’s position
j Did not support HRC’s position
J Did not vote
u Co-sponsored single issue non-discrimination bill
A
V
ON THE ABOVE HUMAN RIGHTS COMPILATION OF THE VOTES OF HAL ROGERS, R-05 KENTUCKY CONGRESSMAN AND SCORING, HAL ROGERS SCORED ZERO ON THE ABOVE COMPILATION OF THE ABOVE VOTES. DO YOU WANT TO CONTINUE IN JANUARY WITH A CONGRESSMAN WHO SCORES ZERO ON THE HRC'S POSITION OF VOTING ON HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES? YOU DON'T ? Well, if you don't want to have the Kentucky Fifth District of the United States Congress scoring a zero on their position on HUMAN RIGHTS, and NONDESCRIMINATION, THEN YOU SHOULD VOTE FOR KENNETH STEPP FOR CONGRESS, AND VOTE TO OUST HAL ROGERS, THE REPUBLICAN FROM THE UNITED STATES CONGRESS.

Thursday, October 11, 2018

An open letter to Carly Carver.

 

Monday, September 24, 2018

The trip around Puerto Rico, continued.

(Continued from the publication just below this one)
Anyway,  the puertoricano's  horse snorted at me and then left.  How can you say, Puerto is tropical, but its mountains toward the center of the island keep people cool.    There are places to see in la Puerto Rico.  After we passed through Ponce, we continued along the southern side of the island which faces the Carribbean Sea, and finally turned inland when we were as far west as San Juan, the island's capital.  We saw a rocky-sided lake with huge gray fish soaking in the fresh water, but they weren't biting that day.   We went on to Aricebo, the place where your Uncle Sam built giant radio-telescopes, where they can monitor the radiation waves and sounds from deep in space on radio-telescopes.   After that, we made fast pass-through near San Juan, and headed back to the Naval Base.  About halfway to the Naval Base from San Juan on their 4 lane highway, they had a wonder in saving law enforcement money--a flashing blue light on top of a telephone pole.  Of course, those seeing it for the first time slowed down to a crawl, afraid some puertoriccano cop would swoop down on them and hand them a ticket.  After I had made a few trips from the Naval base to San Juan, I learned to ignore that flashing blue light on the end of a telephone pole.   I enjoyed living on the Naval Base there for a year and a half, until it was time to return to the States.   Now I enjoy living in the States, here among the bluegrass.
      As a former resident of Puerto Rico, who lived with my wife and son in Puerto Rico, I hope that the expressed will of the people of Puerto Rico will be honored, and that they become the 51st State of the United States.  The belief in an America for more people and another State did not die in 1912, when Arizona and New Mexico attained Statehood.  Puerto Rico voiced support for Statehood in their recent election, and we should honor that by making Puerto Rico our Fifty First State.  Kenneth Stepp.  STEPP FOR KENTUCKY.  ELECT KENNETH STEPP TO CONGRESS, KY-05.  

los puertoriconos aqui!


Donald Trump: ‘Absolute No’ On Puerto Rican Statehood Bid If San Juan Mayor Stays

The president tore into Carmen Yulín Cruz and lamented that he never got a thank you for his response to Hurricane Maria.

X
President Donald Trump said on Sunday that he would not support Puerto Rico’s efforts to obtain statehood if San Juan Mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz continued to hold office in the U.S. territory.
Speaking on Geraldo Rivera’s radio show, Trump called Yulín Cruz “grossly incompetent” and a “horror show” who could stand in the way of Puerto Rico being granted statehood.
“I will tell you this, with the mayor of San Juan as bad as she is and as incompetent as she is, Puerto Rico shouldn’t be talking about statehood until they get some people that really know what they’re doing,” Trump told Rivera.
“When you do have good leadership, that certainly could be something they talk about,” the president continued. “But with people like that involved in Puerto Rico, I would be an absolute no.”
Yulín Cruz, a vocal Trump critic, fired back at the president on Monday, tweeting that he had attacked her for “telling the truth.” She also argued that most Puerto Ricans aren’t in favor of statehood anyway.
More than 3 million U.S. citizens live in Puerto Rico, although they are not afforded many constitutional rights, such as voting in presidential elections, because of the island’s territorial status.
Congress is the only body with power to grant statehood, but many past presidents, including Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, have supported Puerto Rican statehood if that’s what the majority of the islanders wanted.
Puerto Rico’s pro-statehood political party won control of the local legislature, the governor’s mansion and the island’s non-voting congressional seat in 2016. In a June 2017 referendum, Puerto Ricans voted in favor of becoming the 51st U.S. state ― although less than a quarter of registered voters went to the polls, due in part to a boycott by the major parties opposing statehood.
In any case, efforts to obtain statehood have stalled in recent months.
Earlier this month, Puerto Rican Gov. Ricardo Rosselló reiterated his call for statehood while addressing the aftermath of last year’s back-to-back hurricanes.
“We are second-class U.S. citizens,” Rosselló told CBS News. “We live in a colonial territory. It is time to eliminate that. I implore all of the elected officials, particularly now with midterm elections, to have a firm stance: You’re either for colonial territories or against it. You’re either for giving equal rights to the U.S. citizens that live in Puerto Rico or you’re against it.” 
Since hurricanes Irma and Maria ravaged Puerto Rico last September, Trump and Yulín Cruz have repeatedly traded barbs in the media over the federal government’s response. While Trump downplayed the severity of the devastation in the days after Maria made landfall, Yulín Cruz frequently pleaded with the president to send additional aid.
“We are dying, and you are killing us with inefficiency and bureaucracy,” the mayor said at a news conference last September, days before Trump arrived for his first and only post-Maria visit to Puerto Rico. “I hope as the president comes next week, he doesn’t just get an aerial view of the situation. Let him hear the cries of elderly people outside windows and doors screaming, ‘Help us.’”
Rosselló raised the official death toll of Hurricane Maria from 64 to 2,975 last month following the release of a study on storm-related fatalities commissioned by the Puerto Rican government.
Still, Trump has insisted the federal government’s response to Hurricane Maria has been “under-appreciated” and was an “unsung success.”
On Sunday, he called into question the credibility of the study, as he has done several times since its release, claiming some Puerto Rican officials just wanted to “blame everything” on him.
“The truth is you have incompetent leadership and the mayor of San Juan is a grossly incompetent person,” he said. “I love the people of Puerto Rico. And I did a great job. I got things to Puerto Rico that nobody could have gotten. ... And instead of getting thank you, we got nothing but bad publicity.”